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Sundance Institute staff members have compiled the following resources that support antiracism work, including organizations that accept donations of money or time, mental health offerings geared towards Black individuals, reading and viewing lists for self-education, and resources for becoming a stronger ally. We hope this will be a helpful starting point for those in our community as we do the critical work of confronting and dismantling anti-Black racism at the individual and institutional levels.

“The beauty of anti-racism is that you don’t have to pretend to be free of racism to be an anti-racist. Anti-racism is the commitment to fight racism wherever you find it, including in yourself. And it’s the only way forward.”
—Ijeoma Oluo

This list includes national resources as well as local organizations in the areas where Sundance Institute has offices. It is by no means comprehensive, and it will continue to grow. These resources are being compiled by Amber Espinosa-Jones, Moi Santos, Bird Runningwater, Ana Verde, Laure Bender, Burchie Benton, Alexandria Hinchey, Chandler Phillips, Kat Schulze, Evá Williams, Quayla Allen, Marcela Cubas, Marianne Verrone, Karen Bono, Kieran Medina, Ruthie Doyle, Yvonne Jimenez, Maria Santos, and Melissa Bowers on behalf of Sundance Institute's Inclusion Staff Team and Staff Council.

In support of the work of our BIPOC colleagues and allies, please consider making a donation of $25 to any of the funds listed below.

Mental Health Resources

    • The Safe Place, a mental health app
      The Safe Place is a minority mental health app geared towards the Black community. The purpose of The Safe Place is to bring more awareness, education, and hope to this serious issue. Not only can the Black community benefit from this app, but also mental health professionals, friends, and family of ALL colors can be better educated on this issue and do a service by directing their Black friends, co-workers, etc. to the app. All races go through mental illness, but we also can experience it differently because of our race and social backgrounds.
    • Melanin & Mental Health, podcasts, articles, and therapist research
      Melanin & Mental Health® was born out of a desire to connect individuals with culturally competent clinicians committed to serving the mental health needs of Black and Latinx/Hispanic communities. Melanin & Mental Health® is committed to promoting the growth and healing of communities through our website, online directory, and monthly events.
    • Therapy for Black Girls, geared towards Black women seeking therapy
      To be seen, to be heard, and to be understood. So often the stigma surrounding mental health issues and therapy prevents Black women from taking the step of seeing a therapist. This space was developed to present mental health topics in a way that feels more accessible and relevant. <
    • National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network, a healing justice organization
      NQTTCN was officially launched in May 2016, as a call to organize mental health practitioners, to establish a network where therapists can deepen their analysis of healing justice, and where QTPoC community can connect to care. The digital seeds for NQTTCN were planted in 2015 by founder Erica Woodland in an email to close colleagues and comrades. Deeply inspired by a grassroots group of Queer Therapists of Color, QTOC, which was founded in 2009 to provide support and leadership development to mental health practitioners in the San Francisco Bay Area, Erica combined his clinical experience with movement-building experience to launch this vision.
    • Therapy for Black Men, geared towards Black men seeking therapy
      TherapyForBlackMen.org is a directory to help men of color in their search for a therapist. Using the directory, men can search by therapist location and specialization. Searching by location, the results will include the therapists near you and will display their credentials, location, and the issues they treat.
    • The Unplug Collective, free, accessible storytelling for Black and Brown people
      Unplug, at its core, is a place where Black and Brown womxn and nonbinary folks can share their stories about existing in their bodies without being silenced or censored. Whether it be about mental health, body image, fatphobia, medical discrimination, gender, or something else, any story that gives us your valued and often untold perspective about living in your body is something you should send to us!
    • COVID-19 Response Therapist Resource, a community-sourced list
      This is a list of therapists who responded to the @browngirltherapy callout for any mental health care professionals of color who are currently accepting new clients for teletherapy during the pandemic. Organized by state.
    • Third Root Community Health Center, free, guided meditation and yoga classes for BIPOC and QTPOC
      Third Root has waived fees for their BIPOC yoga class and their QTPOC guided meditation, and they have created a “BIPOC Healing Gathering for Grief and Loss Support.”
    • The Four Bodies: A Holistic Toolkit for Coping With Racial Trauma by Jacquelyn Ogorchukwu
      A resource from The Nappy Head Club (a community for anyone who has ever been told they weren’t good enough), this is a guide for healing for the Black and underrepresented: we explore the reclamation of our Black identity. We see you, and we celebrate you.
    • The Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation, offering free therapy for communities of color
      The Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation offers therapy services for those impacted by COVID-19 and is extending services to cover those impacted directly or indirectly by the injustice and maltreatment of African Americans observed over the last few weeks. BLHF is committed to being part of the long-term solution. Round 2 applications opened on June 5.
    • 55 Mental Health Resources for People of Color, published by Online MSW Programs
      This guide has compiled informational resources for culturally diverse populations such as African Americans, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, Latinx Americans, and Native Americans/Alaska Natives. Readers can find mental health resources, podcasts, and advocacy organizations to help address behavioral and emotional health needs, treatment, and how to find care.

Donating Money

Donating Time

Here are some organizations that are looking for volunteers at this time. Please proceed with caution when leaving your house, and wear the correct personal protective gear.

If you feel sick or have a cough, please stay home. Protect protesters and essential workers and stop the spread of COVID-19. If you are protesting or volunteering, please get tested regularly. Below we have provided information on where to get tested depending on where you are located.

    • New York: To schedule a COVID-19 test in New York, complete an online assessment. You will receive a follow-up phone call within one business day to schedule your appointment.
    • Los Angeles: You can sign up for an appointment at this link.
    • Salt Lake City: You can find a testing center near you at this link. Calvary Baptist Church is offering no-cost testing.
  • *These organizations offer volunteer opportunities for those stuck at home.

  • Tips on Protesting Safely

    (via Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez)

    1. LOOK OUT FOR THINGS THAT DON’T SEEM RIGHT. There are increasing reports and investigations that white supremacists may be infiltrating these protests, breaking windows, and destroying property. If anything seems off to you, DOCUMENT IT. Always check who is organizing.
    2. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS OF GRASSROOTS BLACK ORGANIZERS. They have been at this a long time and are disciplined in the ropes of community organizing and demonstration. It IS a discipline. Follow trusted leaders whose goal has been the focused pursuit of justice. If they just showed up, that’s a red flag.
    3. HAVE A BUDDY. Make sure someone is keeping an eye on you and check in on them.
    4. STAY SAFE and take care of each other.
    WHAT TO WEAR
    • Nondescript, solid, layered clothing that covers any identifiable tattoos
    • Heat-resistant gloves
    • Goggles
    • Mask
    • Emergency contacts written down
    • Tie your hair up
    WHAT TO BRING
    • Water for drinking & tear gas
    • Cash/change
    • ID
    • Bandages & first-aid supplies
    • Washcloth
    • Snacks
    • Ear plugs
    • Protest signs
    AVOID BRINGING
    • Cell phone without first turning off Face/Touch ID, going on airplane mode, disabling data
    • Jewelry
    • Anything you don’t want to be arrested with
    • Contact lenses
    WHAT TO WEARWHAT TO BRINGAVOID BRINGING
    • Nondescript, solid, layered clothing that covers any identifiable tattoos
    • Heat-resistant gloves
    • Goggles
    • Mask
    • Emergency contacts written down
    • Tie your hair up
    • Water for drinking & tear gas
    • Cash/change
    • ID
    • Bandages & first-aid supplies
    • Washcloth
    • Snacks
    • Ear plugs
    • Protest signs
    • Cell phone without first turning off Face/Touch ID, going on airplane mode, disabling data
    • Jewelry
    • Anything you don’t want to be arrested with
    • Contact lenses


    *REMINDER*

    DO NOT post or share images/videos of protesters without their permission!

    This could endanger their immigration status, bring unwanted consequences, and lead to arrests/fines.

    Resources for Immigrants Protesting

    Tips

    • Know your rights.
    • Have an immigration lawyer’s number written when you go out.
    • Stay within a group.
    • Do not post photos/videos that easily identify yourself at a protest.

    Additional Protesting Tips and Resources

    Demonstrations in Los Angeles

    • Find live updates about demonstrations across Los Angeles by following @justiceforgeorgela on Instagram.

    Demonstrations in New York

    • Find live updates about demonstrations across New York by following @justiceforgeorgenyc on Instagram.

    Demonstrations in Utah

  • #DoTheWork: 30-Day Course on Allyship to Black Women by Rachel Cargle

    This free, 30-day course is designed to be an eye-opener and a call to action for those who seek to be allies to Black women. To #DoTheWork, one must be intentional in breaking down the systems that continue to oppress and disenfranchise the Black community, with Black women being the most affected. Going through these daily prompts, you will be called to think critically and act tangibly in solidarity. Participating in this will be your first small step in working towards dissolving these systems, institutions, and ideologies that continue to negatively affect Black women and their communities yet benefit white people in this country.

  • Call Your Elected Officials

    Sign Petitions

    • Explore this collection of petitions that you can sign to make meaningful changes. Note this website is being actively updated and has been translated into various languages.

Recommended Reading & Viewing

“[Allyship] is not supposed to be about you. It’s not supposed to be about your feelings. It’s not supposed to be a way of glorifying yourself at the expense of the folks you claim to be an ally to. It’s not supposed to be a performance. It’s supposed to be a way of living your life that doesn’t reinforce the same oppressive behaviors you’re claiming to be against.” —Mia McKenzie author and activist

Allyship Resources

This list is not exhaustive, nor can it ever be complete. Being an ally means daily work, education, and action, and the onus is on you to do the research and the work.