Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh

In GIFs: Park Chan-wook’s Oldboy vs. Spike Lee’s Remake

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on facebook

Nate von Zumwalt and Jared Hurst

Surely Spike Lee knows that the “remake” is the most hazardous terrain for a director to explore. Beyond the usual critics, there lie an obsessive and carping band of film fans ready to lambaste any rethinking of the original vision—and often before a script has even surfaced. 

On that note, Spike Lee’s Oldboy recently hit theaters, which reimagines Park Chan-wook’s 2005 Sundance Film Festival selection of the same name. Lee is considerably loyal to the original in his remake, which see Josh Brolin swapped in for Choi Min-sik as a kidnapped man left to his own devices as he tries to escape imprisonment and track down his captors. Below we’ve juxtaposed five GIFs from each version to emphasize the similarities in both narrative and style.

Which Oldboy do you prefer?

Both men wake up disoriented in an isolated hotel room, replete with surveillance cameras.

Each is resigned to flipping through channels to begin piecing together their stories…

…Which leads to the realization that their wives have been murdered, and a wall must be punched.

In an obsessive desire to find and kill their captors, they spend downtime training and shadowboxing.

And when they spring from suitcases, they check their wallets and prepare to avenge their wives’ deaths.

And then Nicolas Cage shows up for no reason at all.

News title Lorem Ipsum

Sundance Institute Piloting Direct Individual Support for Mediamakers Through the Sundance Institute | Humanities Sustainability Fellowship

Long before the COVID-19 pandemic upended life in general, and halted production and distribution for many creatives, the nonfiction field was plagued by issues of sustainability. For several years, sustainability has been an urgent and vigorous topic of study, debate, and organizing, as more and more filmmakers find it difficult, if not impossible, to make a living solely on the basis of their creative work. 

In Memoriam: Diane Weyermann (1955–2021)

A singular force within the documentary film world with a global reach, Diane Weyermann passed away at age 66 after battling cancer. Over the course of her 30-year career as a funder and an executive, her work elevated the documentary form and expanded its cultural impact.

Donate copy lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapib.