Ted Dintersmith

Sundance Institute

Ted Dintersmith’s 25-year career in the venture capital world has enabled him to focus his passion for storytelling to effect change and promote good through an intersection of innovation and education. He believes in the role of film to inspire social change and has connected with the Sundance Institute to see his vision through. Ted is a founding partner and generous supporter of our Catalyst Initiative, Sundance Institute’s initiative that connects forward thinking financiers with the world of independent film. During Catalyst Forum, creative investors are presented with a slate of important stories that are searching to be told. This program creates a supportive community and meaningful dialogue that opens new paths to production for the best new independent films. Ted along with Sundance Institute. beliece that this is a vital step in connecting the artist with the audience.

The first time I attended Sundance Film Festival was in 2004, and I still recall vividly how energizing the entire experience was. So many talented and creative artists launching inspiring films — all with the help of Sundance Institute. It was an event that changed my life. Then, a few years ago, I realized that I could align my passions for making the world better with like-minded filmmakers. As I became more engaged in supporting new and groundbreaking stories, I talked to Keri Putnam about the possibility of organizing a Thought Leadership Summit, bringing together filmmakers, experts from the industry, and creative investors. I was proud to donate the seed money for the Sundance Institute team to dream up and then quickly realize Catalyst Forum. Like everything Sundance does, the team has now organized and held two amazing Catalyst summits, with astounding results. The people at Sundance are the very best, and being a small part of their many efforts is a real honor.

– Ted Dintersmith

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Alexis Chikaeze as Kai in 'Miss Juneteenth,' coming to digital platforms June 19

Channing Godfrey Peoples on a Bittersweet ‘Miss Juneteenth’ Release and the Urgency of Portraying Black Humanity on Screen

After premiering at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival, Channing Godfrey Peoples’s debut feature is hitting digital platforms this Juneteenth—the day for which the film is named and which is very close to the director’s heart. “I feel like I’ve been living Miss Juneteenth my whole life,” she says.
The June 19 holiday—which commemorates the day slavery was finally abolished in Texas (more than two years after the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation was issued)—is celebrated in her hometown of Fort Worth with a deep sense of reverence and community, with barbecues, a parade, and a scholarship pageant for young Black women.

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