Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh

6 Sundance Institute-Supported Films Take Home Spirit Awards

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email
Share on facebook

Eighth Grade

Nate von Zumwalt

A 28-year-old YouTuber. A hip-hop vocalist. A kid and his amateur skate vids.

Sundance Institute-supported filmmakers—a trio from wildly distinct backgrounds—swept the first-timer categories at the Film Independent Spirit Awards over the weekend. Breakout years for first-time feature filmmakers Bo Burnham, Boots Riley, and Bing Liu culminated in hardware at the year’s most recognized indie film awards ceremony.

Like their filmmaking exploits, the group’s individual journeys to this point have little in common. Burnham, the YouTuber turned musician/comedian, made a coming-of-age film that astounded critics and casual filmgoers with Eighth Grade, an emotionally raw portrait of middle school life. Riley, the longtime lead vocalist for The Coup, helmed what’s maybe the year’s most batshit crazy comedy (Sorry to Bother You) that threads the needle between hysterical and all-too-real. And Liu, whose decade-old skate videos formed the scaffolding for his singular slice of Rust Belt Americana, showed a dexterity for nonfiction that promises to shine for years to come.

Congratulations to all of this year’s Sundance-supported Spirit Awards winners. Check them out below.

BEST EDITING

Joe Bini, You Were Never Really Here

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (Directors: Morgan Neville; Producer: Caryn Capotosto, Nicholas Ma)

BEST FIRST FEATURE

Sorry to Bother You (Director: Boots Riley; Producers:Nina Yang Bongiovi, Jonathan Duffy, Charles D. King, George Rush, Forest Whitaker, Kelly Williams)

BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY

Bo Burnham, Eighth Grade

TRUER THAN FICTION AWARD

Bing Liu, Minding the Gap


BONNIE AWARD

Debra Granik

News title Lorem Ipsum

Sundance Institute Piloting Direct Individual Support for Mediamakers Through the Sundance Institute | Humanities Sustainability Fellowship

Long before the COVID-19 pandemic upended life in general, and halted production and distribution for many creatives, the nonfiction field was plagued by issues of sustainability. For several years, sustainability has been an urgent and vigorous topic of study, debate, and organizing, as more and more filmmakers find it difficult, if not impossible, to make a living solely on the basis of their creative work. 

In Memoriam: Diane Weyermann (1955–2021)

A singular force within the documentary film world with a global reach, Diane Weyermann passed away at age 66 after battling cancer. Over the course of her 30-year career as a funder and an executive, her work elevated the documentary form and expanded its cultural impact.

Donate copy lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapib.