5 Sundance Films That Prove Your Job Isn’t So Bad
C.O.G.
5 Sundance Films That Prove Your Job Isn’t So Bad
Clerks
5 Sundance Films That Prove Your Job Isn’t So Bad
American Job

5 Sundance Films That Prove Your Job Could Be Worse

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Something about the notion of Labor Day has always seemed archaic to me. Then again, the guy who questions a day off is no better than the 7th grader who reminds the teacher that homework hasn’t been collected – exactly 10 seconds before the bell rings. Thank you, young comrade.

In reality, millions of hardworking Americans, whether toiling away at jobs they resent, tolerate, or unabashedly love, deserve a day of rest. And if you’re feeling especially bad about your current line of work, surely these wretched occupations from the films below will bring some levity to the situation. Because, if nothing else, misery loves company. Happy Labor Day.

American Job

Director Chris Smith’s deftness in depicting man’s idiosyncrasies and other inscrutable character blemishes arrived with 1996’s American Job, the narrative precursor to his better-recognized documentary accomplishments American Movie and The Yes Men. In American Job, we are subjected to the tedium of some of America’s most unappealing jobs through the lens of our aimless protagonist Randy Scott, whose helpless disposition is a wry bit of a humor in and of itself. Smith’s shrewd verite filmmaking further advances the film’s comically humdrum atmosphere, leaving us to intermittently pinch ourselves, just to be sure Randy’s reality is not in fact our own.

Roger and Me

Before he became the most recognizable and polarizing figure in documentary film – and before Detroit became the national punch line for America’s economic woes – Michael Moore was just a man meddling in the country’s innumerable issues, hoping to expose some truth. Ok, so nothing has really changed after all. But in Roger and Me, Moore’s first filmmaking effort, we are privy to the simplicity of the man and his camera. In this particular endeavor, Moore’s obligation is to the thousands of Americans out of their jobs thanks to General Motors. A Flint, Michigan, native himself, Moore returns home with a steadfast – and quite humorous – mission to sit down with the man behind the madness, and the head of GM, Roger Smith.

Dirty Work

There is “dirty work,” and then there is the repugnant, nausea-inducing work that the three singular subjects in Dirty Work manage to pursue as both their profession and passion. At times more probing than perhaps desired, this surprisingly accessible documentary explores the (mostly) unenviable worlds of Darrell, a septic tank pumper, Russ, a bull semen collector, and Bernard, an embalmer. Beneath its unpleasant surface lies not only the reality that “someone’s gotta’ do it,” but that someone may actually be happy to do it. Watch it via Sundance #ArtistServices.

Clerks

It would be criminally remiss to omit the most seminal indie film to explore the torment of menial work. Kevin Smith’s Clerks transcends the cult classic label, achieving something closer to the sacred embodiment of independent filmmaking. This lo-fi, indulgently cheesy trailer from ’94 beats any attempt at a film description.

C.O.G.

Kyle Alvarez’s 2013 Sundance Film Festival selection stars a self-effacing Jonathan Groff as a young man who takes up the obscure, and perhaps marginally idyllic, vocation of an apple picker. Based on a David Sedaris short story, Alvarez’s smartly adapted narrative is suffused with undertones of sexual discovery and religious confusion, set to the bucolic milieu of an apple orchard. At the end of its runtime, the idea of fleeing to farm life doesn’t sound bad at all…