This Is Personal (formerly Til Everybody's Free)

About

The Women’s March mobilized millions of women to protest after the inauguration of President Trump. But working across ideologies to combat injustice has its challenges. Academy Award–nominated director Amy Berg returns to the Sundance Film Festival with an insider look at the struggle for intersectional activism among the Women’s March leadership.

Berg captures the collaborative organizing process and hopeful energy of the first marches in 2017 and spends time behind the scenes highlighting the sustained work that happens after the crowds subside. For Women’s March co-president Tamika Mallory and community-organizing leader Erika Andiola, the march is only the tip of the iceberg of their broader activism—Andiola championing immigration rights and Mallory protesting gun violence. When Mallory comes under fire for her affiliations with Minister Louis Farrakhan, a powerful conversation between Mallory and Rabbi Rachel Timoner opens up a dialogue about intersectional leadership.

In light of the recent controversy around four of the Women’s March leaders, including Mallory, Berg’s film offers a timely springboard for a discussion on issues that have plagued the women’s movement for a century.

YEAR 2018

CATEGORY Special Events

COUNTRY U.S.A.

RUN TIME 98 min

COMPANY Paramount Television

EMAIL gabriela_zapata@paramount.com

PHONE (323) 956-5482

Credits

Director
Producers
Editors
Director Of Photography
Composer

Artist Bio

Amy Berg

Amy Berg is a critically acclaimed documentary filmmaker. Her first film, Deliver Us from Evil, was nominated for an Academy Award and a DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary. She went on to direct West of Memphis (2012 Sundance Film Festival), Prophet's Prey (2015 Sundance Film Festival), and Janis: Little Girl Blue. Berg’s series Dogs is currently on Netflix, and her highly anticipated series on the Adnan Syed case will air March 2019 on HBO.